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Standing Room Only: BadUSB at Black Hat

 

Our special guest blogger is Chris Louie, an IronKey sales engineer, who joined the company in 2011. 

As I took my seat in the packed Black Hat ballroom, I could sense the level of concern as everyone anxiously awaited the findings on BadUSB. Attacks against USB flash drives are nothing new, but they’ve always centered on the data being compromised or leaked.  Now we’re about to learn about a radically different type of attack. Suddenly the lights dim and the session title flashes across the screen: “BadUSB – On accessories that turn evil” presented by the authors of the malware.

Immediately, things looked bleak for security-minded professionals everywhere. A new type of threat has emerged! Malware is no longer relegated to only files stored on USB flash drives, but can now reside in the controller firmware inside the USB flash drive. And to make matters worse, it doesn’t just affect USB flash drives, but any USB device that has the ability to update its firmware, such as Android-based phones and tablets. BadUSB also has the ability to trick the computer into thinking a flash drive is a mouse or keyboard. Once a computer is infected, it will attempt to infect every USB device that connects to it in the future.

Now if that’s not enough to keep CIOs and CISOs awake at night, the malware authors state that there is currently no mechanism to detect or remove BadUSB from affected devices and computers. It acts as a launch pad to attack computers with the malware author’s attack of choice. Installation of Remote Access Trojans, key loggers, DNS cache poisoning, botnet creation and ransomeware are just a few of the cyber-criminal tools that can be deployed with the help of BadUSB.

Fortunately, not all is lost! BadUSB takes advantage of a commonly found practice in the flash drive industry: the vast majority of USB devices do not require digitally signed code in order to do a firmware update. Since day one, every IronKey device has followed the best practice of requiring digitally signed code for firmware updates to protect against this exact type of attack vector.

During the Q&A session with the malware authors, someone asked if requiring digitally signed code for firmware updates would protect a USB device from this attack.  The audience were assured that those devices are not vulnerable to this attack.

So get rid of that potentially dangerous flash drive and upgrade to a secure flash drive that cannot get infected with BadUSB.