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IronKey eUSB for McAfee ePolicy Orchestrator (ePO)

Supporting McAfee, MXI, Imation and IronKey F and H Hardware Encrypted USB Drives, and ePO 4.6 and ePO 5.1

IronKey has recently released IronKey eUSB for McAfee ePolicy Orchestrator (ePO), an extension for ePO that provides administrators the ability to deploy and manage IronKey hardware encrypted devices. This extension provides many features such as the ability to centrally manage the devices, set customized policies for authentication, initialization, revocation and backup, set password policies including complexity and retry, remotely wipe devices, and use self-recovery of passwords to reduce costs.

So what devices are supported? The better question is what brands. Today eUSB for McAfee ePO supports IronKey F200, F150 and F100 flash drives, and IronKey H200 and H100 hard drives. In addition, there is support for older MXI, Imation and even McAfee branded devices. How did we get here? The original version of the eUSB extension was released in late 2008 and was created through collaboration between McAfee and MXI Security (now part of IronKey). In 2011, following Imation’s acquisition of MXI Security, Encryptx and IronKey, McAfee dropped support of eUSB. Imation took over the support of the original code and did minor upgrades such as support for German and Japanese languages resulting in product versions under the Imation brand.

In 2014 with the continued growth of ePO and increasing demand for managed encrypted storage, IronKey re-started development of the eUSB software. This new release, licensed per device managed, supports both ePO versions 4.6 and 5.1, and includes language support for English, German, Japanese and French. This release will also be certified by McAfee’s SIA labs

IronKey continues to be excited about our expanding support of ePO. We’ve seen strong interest from many ePO administrators who have been looking for the ability to whitelist and manage hardware secure devices on their systems and IronKey looks forward to helping fulfill these requirements.

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Majority of Healthcare Breaches Are Due to Loss or Theft, Not Hackers

I just recently read an article about how a healthcare organization lost backup hard drives containing personal information on nearly 40,000 of its clients. To make matters worse, the article stated that there was “no mention of strong encryption being applied to the records, implying that they were stored relatively insecurely.” WHAT?  I shake my head in frustration because there is a simple solution. Why don’t more healthcare companies deploy secure USB?

You might be surprised to know that the majority of breaches come from lost or stolen devices, not hackers. In fact, sixty-eight percent of all healthcare breaches are from loss and theft. This leads me to conclude that most healthcare companies insecurely store, and therefore risk losing their clients protected health information (PHI) such as birth dates, medical records, and Social Security numbers.

Sadly, it looks like this trend won’t be ending anytime soon.  A recent healthcare data breach forecast predicted that employees (not hackers) will continue to be the greatest threat to securing healthcare data including PHI.  The forecast goes on to say that despite all signs pointing to employees as the largest threat to a company’s security, business leaders will continue to neglect the issue in favor of buying more “appealing” security technologies aimed at preventing intrusions from outsiders in 2015. (sigh)

So here’s the good news – there is a workable solution that’s easy for healthcare organizations to implement. One simple, affordable option is to store PHI and other confidential data on a portable, encrypted external hard drive or USB instead of storing data directly on the laptop.  There’s a class of readily available hardware encrypted devices that are virtually unhackable and can be remotely wiped should they be lost or stolen.  And, these drives deploy the highest standards of protection with AES-256 encryption.   These highly secure drives even protect data and applications from malware like BadUSB. And their rugged design makes them nearly indestructible.  They’ve even been known to survive an autoclave! 

IronKey™ offers the most secure storage solutions and mobile workspaces available.  So, don’t be tomorrow’s headline.  Check out our healthcare security solutions today.

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Introducing the IronKey S1000 USB 3.0 Storage Drive

 

Meet the newest addition to the IronKey™ secure storage family of flash drives:  The IronKey S1000.  Building upon IronKey’s history of providing the world’s most secure USB storage devices, users now have a choice between IronKey’s industry-leading USB 2.0 and 3.0 devices.  Check out some of the highlights of the IronKey S1000:

Blazing Fast USB 3.0 Performance

Realize read speeds of up to 400 MB/sec and write speeds up to 300MB/sec. That’s double the performance of competing hardware-encrypted USB 3.0 flash drives and up to 10x faster than a USB 2.0 drive. Storage size has doubled too, with capacity up to 128GB.

Strongest USB Security Available Today

The S1000 protects files with Federal Information Processing Standards (FIPS) 140-2 Level 3 and National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST)-approved XTS-AES 256-bit encryption, ensuring compliance with the most stringent government and industry regulations while allowing workers to remain mobile.  As with our other products, the S1000 requires code signing for firmware updates  and protects against attacks such as BadUSB and now the most recent Equation Group hard drive attacks to which other USB vendors are vulnerable.

Additionally, the IronKey S1000 military-grade, ruggedized design resists physical tampering and will self-destruct if unauthorized attempts to physically obtain access to the data are made.

Backed by a Lifetime Warranty

Our products are built to last.  They can withstand being run over by a Land Rover and multiple cycles in the washing machine.   In an industry first, we are offering a lifetime warranty for our IronKey S1000 family.  

The IronKey S1000 is available in two versions for maximum flexibility:  IronKey Basic S1000 and the centrally managed IronKey Enterprise S1000. 

Which product should I use?

If you have a desktop, laptop or tablet with USB 2.0 ports, the IronKey S250 and D250 devices are a perfect fit.  But if you have a desktop, laptop or tablet with USB 3.0 ports, you’ll want to look to the IronKey S1000 to take advantage of the faster speeds, enhanced encryption and the lifetime warranty.   

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Equation Group Attack on Hard Drives – What Can Your Organization Do?

 

This week Moscow-based Kaspersky Lab published a report that examines a group of hackers, the Equation group, and the depths they have gone to for many years to spy.  The report outlines the attacks in detail and highlights, “the group’s attack technologies exceed anything we have ever seen before.  This is the ability to infect the hard drive firmware.”

As you consider your options, keep in mind there are a number of approaches to prevent the Equation group’s attack against hard drives.  

 A fundamental feature that every enterprise bound hard drive should have is preventing its firmware from being altered by an unauthorized agent.  The best protection against this vulnerability is to use code signing for firmware updates. Such devices will not allow unsigned firmware to be loaded onto the device.  As a further level of protection if somehow unsigned firmware was present on the device, it simply will not operate.

For your external hard drives I suggest these be replaced as soon as possible with drives that support firmware signing.

Protecting your internal hard drives is more difficult.  These drives could be infected at any time by self-replicating code such as “Fanny”, physical media (e.g. CD-ROMS), USB devices susceptible to BadUSB, and Web-based exploits. Swapping out internal hard drives is an expensive and time consuming proposition.  One option is to immediately switch to a Windows To Go flash drive that supports firmware signing for all of your critical systems as a hard drive replacement. 

Windows To Go equips users with a portable Windows corporate image.  It uses the flash drive as the system disk, completely insulating the user from the risk of any hard drive infections on the onboard hard drive. This is significantly less costly than replacing the computer’s internal hard drive with a FIPS-approved hard drive and can be easily done in the field without having to pull apart the computer. And, as an added benefit, Windows To Go drives can be centrally managed enabling organizations to track the devices and disable them if lost or stolen.

IronKey™ secure USB hard drive, flash storage and Windows To Go devices are not vulnerable to the Equation group’s malware or the BadUSB attack. IronKey’s leadership in security, including its use of digital signatures in all controller firmware, makes its products immune to these threats.

 

 

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Standing Room Only: BadUSB at Black Hat

 

Our special guest blogger is Chris Louie, an IronKey sales engineer, who joined the company in 2011. 

As I took my seat in the packed Black Hat ballroom, I could sense the level of concern as everyone anxiously awaited the findings on BadUSB. Attacks against USB flash drives are nothing new, but they’ve always centered on the data being compromised or leaked.  Now we’re about to learn about a radically different type of attack. Suddenly the lights dim and the session title flashes across the screen: “BadUSB – On accessories that turn evil” presented by the authors of the malware.

Immediately, things looked bleak for security-minded professionals everywhere. A new type of threat has emerged! Malware is no longer relegated to only files stored on USB flash drives, but can now reside in the controller firmware inside the USB flash drive. And to make matters worse, it doesn’t just affect USB flash drives, but any USB device that has the ability to update its firmware, such as Android-based phones and tablets. BadUSB also has the ability to trick the computer into thinking a flash drive is a mouse or keyboard. Once a computer is infected, it will attempt to infect every USB device that connects to it in the future.

Now if that’s not enough to keep CIOs and CISOs awake at night, the malware authors state that there is currently no mechanism to detect or remove BadUSB from affected devices and computers. It acts as a launch pad to attack computers with the malware author’s attack of choice. Installation of Remote Access Trojans, key loggers, DNS cache poisoning, botnet creation and ransomeware are just a few of the cyber-criminal tools that can be deployed with the help of BadUSB.

Fortunately, not all is lost! BadUSB takes advantage of a commonly found practice in the flash drive industry: the vast majority of USB devices do not require digitally signed code in order to do a firmware update. Since day one, every IronKey device has followed the best practice of requiring digitally signed code for firmware updates to protect against this exact type of attack vector.

During the Q&A session with the malware authors, someone asked if requiring digitally signed code for firmware updates would protect a USB device from this attack.  The audience were assured that those devices are not vulnerable to this attack.

So get rid of that potentially dangerous flash drive and upgrade to a secure flash drive that cannot get infected with BadUSB.