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Thwarting the Insider Threat

 

Autumn is returning, reluctantly we’re turning our back on summer, and we are looking forward to the Holiday season. Undoubtedly, this comes with increased people taking vacations, working remotely, and the unlucky few taking their laptops on holidays. For many organizations, this is pretty risky business because the sensitive corporate information is now travelling along with their employees. Although many organizations rarely expect their loyal employees to steal company data, many are prepared for security attacks.

Following the Edward Snowden revelations in 2013, IT departments are now tasked with monitoring potential insider threats. Snowden’s work with US intelligence agencies put him in the position of a highly trusted employee, providing him with everything he needed to accomplish what he set out to do. There were no measures in place to prevent what was possibly the biggest information leak in the history of the US.

The risks come from those who intentionally misuse their access to data to cause a detrimental impact on the confidentiality and integrity of sensitive information.

Although there are a number of routes to secure intellectual property, if the authorities, from whom Snowden was stealing from, had a manageable and encrypted flash drive, such as an IronKey™ Windows To Go drive, they could have tracked the information from anywhere. Any activity on the drive could have been monitored from an on-premise or cloud-based management service. This would have ensured them the ability to restrict where the device could be used, or resort to remotely locking it down, so no one could access the data.

If data isn’t encrypted, its integrity can easily and quickly be compromised, and therefore it is essential to know where, and who, is accessing information. This can be difficult across a fragmented IT environment, however, companies need to be confident that if a device is considered to be compromised, they can remotely lock it down, wipe it, or initiate a self-destruct sequence to remove the data, to protect themselves and their stakeholders.

Protecting intellectual property should be a priority for all organizations. Disabling outdated user accounts when employees exit an organization, implementing policies with privileged account passwords, updating them regularly and limiting access to corporate systems, are all crucial to keeping data secure. That’s where the Windows to Go Drive comes in:  a secure, IT-managed, Microsoft certified USB drive that contains a fully functional corporate Windows desktop. Employees insert the Microsoft certified USB drives into their home computers, hot desks, or tablets that feature USB ports, and receive a secure desktop  as well as secure access to all applications they use in an office setting.

Unlike a virtualized or online remote access solution, this portable workspace offers full host computer isolation, which means documents cannot be saved to the host machine, but are saved to the USB drive.

This way, all data will remain secure without the threat of a potential data breach ensuring safety for all!

 

IronKey Workspace W700

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The Cost of Cybercrime

 

Hackers are holding the world to ransom with cyber-attacks costing the global economy more than £238 billion a year¹. These attacks damage the global economy almost as much as illegal drugs and piracy, with financial losses from cyber theft resulting in a potential 150,000 European job losses.¹ Cybercrime is a growing menace which is proving to be an ever growing challenge for individuals and businesses. US retailing giant Target saw its earnings drop 46% after an attack that leaked more than 40 million customer credit card details², whilst eBay and Office have also been ‘hit’ this year, with customer data compromised.

Despite these devastating implications, the public, corporates and their employees continue to be careless with their valuable and highly confidential data –residing on laptops, tablets and mobile devices. Cyber espionage and theft of individuals’ personal information is believed to have affected more than 800 million people during 2013¹, and our mobile working culture has made data security an even greater challenge.

With IDC estimating that over one million smartphones were shipped last year³, someone somewhere in your company is using a personal, mobile device to connect to a corporate network and download sensitive data – making your organization a sitting target for cybercriminals. Companies must equip their employees with the means to protect corporate data from threats such as identity theft and cyber espionage, whilst mitigating the dangers associated with unsecured devices and free Wi-Fi hotspots.

Mobile devices need to maintain the same high levels of security as office-based desktops and servers, with only IT provisioned laptops or tablets connected to corporate networks. But, the best way of ensuring hackers can’t gain access to your company data, is by storing all your data on a secure fully encrypted Windows To Go USB flash drive. It provides employees with an IT managed and provisioned Windows workspace that replicates their secure office desktop environment, on any device that the USB is plugged into. This also means IT departments do not need to deploy individual computers but rather can deploy the Windows To Go workspace on USB drives which saves time, resources and introduces vast cost savings.

Staff awareness plays a crucial role in protecting the company network against cybercrime. Often under-estimating the inherent security risks of using personal devices in the office, employees must be educated to handle these responsibly – on a proactive, ongoing basis rather than waiting until a security breach occurs, when it’s too late.

With so many high profile security breaches making the headlines, organizations want to know that corporate data is secure at all times, regardless of where it resides, whilst employees need the flexibility to work remotely. Cybercrime can have a devastating impact on your business in terms of cost and reputation. Your organization can’t afford to be tomorrow’s headline…

 

Sources:

¹McAfee report, June 2014 – Net Losses: Estimating the Global Cost of Cybercrime

² http://www.businessweek.com/articles/2014-03-13/target-missed-alarms-in-epic-hack-of-credit-card-data

³ International Data Corporation (IDC)Worldwide Quarterly Mobile Phone Tracker, Jan 2014

 

 

 


 

 

 

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Travel Light and Secure

 

Hi, I’m Peter. I’m a Senior IT guy working for a big, growing enterprise.  I set the strategy and I’m responsible for the execution of IT infrastructure in my organization.   I need to worry about cost, security, and keeping my customers happy. We have pretty solid IT processes leveraging Microsoft tools, so I’m not about to set my IT team on some wild new solution that requires years to integrate. Recently, after a big meeting with the execs on cutting costs, I came across Windows to Go from Microsoft. Here is a solution that is secure, can save tons of money, make my customers happy, and fits into my IT workflow – Freakin’ SWEET!  My CISO stood up and applauded when I presented this to senior MGMT.  Needless to say I’ve become a big fan. In fact, they call me Windows To Go Guy around here. There are so many ways to apply this technology across my organization. I don’t get a commission on this stuff – I just love cool technology that makes sense. Here’s my blog entry:

Disclaimer: This blog is based on real Windows To Go ® use cases.  The character is fictitious to protect the names of our customers.  Any resemblance to actual customers is coincidental and not intentional.

I’m a Windows to Go guy. I carry my workspace around with me in my pocket, wherever I go. I don’t have to worry about hiding a laptop under the car seat. I don’t have to worry about it sliding off the seat during a sudden stop and I don’t need to try fit it under my coat during a sudden downpour.

One evening after work I had promised to stop at the local store to pick up some groceries. In line ahead of me were some military personnel dressed in camo. I noticed one person was carrying her laptop.
“Hey folks, I really appreciate what you guys do for our Country, but tell me, what’s with the laptop in the grocery store-are you expecting an email from the president?” I joked.

The corporal replied, “Military rules- laptops can’t leave our side. We even take them into the bathroom”.

“That stinks,” I replied.  “Let me show you something,” I replied. I whipped out my IronKey Workspace W500™, my PC on a Stick™ and explained that this was my laptop, FIPS secured against the worst imaginable attacker. It is virtually indestructible too, and I intentionally dropped it onto the hard tile floor to make my point.

“I have got to get my hands on one of those” she said.

“You are right about that, we can make your next bathroom or grocery stop a much more pleasant experience.” I replied.

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Will the World Cup Result in a Red Card for your Business?

 

With the ‘Hacktivist’ group Anonymous having announced they were preparing a full scale cyber-attack on the World Cup’s corporate sponsors during the tournament, and an influx in World Cup related malware, security threats are likely to be the topic of choice for all those looking to protect against potential breaches and attacks during the tournament.

IT managers will have been steeling themselves for a potential spike in lost corporate devices, such as USB’s, tablets and mobile devices, during the World Cup. Whether it be a flight to Brazil, a booze fuelled train journey home, or live streaming a match from your laptop, the potential for a security breach, and the resulting consequences, could be more excruciating than a bite from Luis Suarez!

Whilst the tournament might be coming to a close, the risks associated with remote workers and mobile devices are still an inherent danger to corporate data. Many of us undertake work while commuting, with little regard for the security of the information we are working on, so whether you are lucky enough to have flown out to watch a match, or simply travelling home after watching the game in the pub, the need to secure your devices is never more crucial.

With shrinking boundaries between work devices and work-enabled personal devices, the risk of corporate data falling into the wrong hands is a huge possibility. Employees dropping memory sticks, leaving files on trains, and laptops in bars, are all high probabilities, and inevitably, these devices will contain data not meant for prying eyes.

Failing to protect the vast volumes of information they carry and not equipping employees with the IT tools required to securely manage and handle information while travelling could result in a ‘red card’ for your business.

No computer or tablet not ‘locked down’ by IT should ever be connected to the corporate network, either from inside (fixed line or BYOD) or outside (VPN of VDI). Allocating employees a corporate computer for use inside the network and an IT secured USB device for outside would simplify security and avoid frustrations typically related with tight security policies such as these.

Whether your data is in transit or at rest, encryption is absolutely essential to safeguarding confidential company information. Whether you use strong authentication or hardware encryption will very much depend on your organisation, you need to be able to manage encrypted devices in order to ensure that if there are any concerns that data integrity has been compromised it is possible to remotely wipe the device.

Accidents will happen, but being vigilant in your security practices, and, educating and enabling your employees could be as easy as knocking England out of the Cup altogether.
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When It Comes to the Cloud, What do Small Businesses Need to Think About?

 

The move towards hosting applications in the cloud shows no signs of petering out. More and more companies are keen to realise the operational benefits that a cloud-
based model has to offer; not to mention the possibility to reduce some CAPEX spend. While many emerging technologies can feel like they are exclusively for the ‘big
boys,’ the great thing about the cloud is that whether you are one person or several thousand, there is a platform out there to help you meet your requirements.

The one downside to being a small business however is that often you don’t have the in-house IT knowledge to understand what, if any, security issues you could be
opening up your business to by opting to store data in the cloud. Here are my top tips to helping you make the most of the cloud, while remaining secure:

* Most small businesses aren’t all that concerned about cloud security and are keen to tap into the benefits that the cloud has to offer. However, as a note of caution, think
carefully about your cloud strategy. While providers might proclaim their offering to be “secure enough”, SMBs shouldn’t accept this assertion at face value – especially if
you intend to store customer data in the cloud as there are strict laws that govern how data is stored, managed and protected.

* Many SMBs can be confused about the best way forward, but take a look at larger companies operating in your sector, what lessons can you learn from them? Are they
using public or private clouds to give employees access to shared data? In the context of your organisation what are the pros and cons of each?

* While it can be tempting to think that your cloud provider ‘has everything covered’ it pays to know what is happening ‘under the hood’ of your cloud security offering. For
example, if the cloud service is responsible for the encryption of data, there is a risk that your keys can be compromised either internally by an employee or by a hacker
who is able to breach the management system and retrieve the keys. To be as secure as possible SMBs, and not their provider, should own and control the encryption
keys.

* For the director of a SMB all this talk of encryption and keys might sound a bit daunting, but the key piece of advice here to mitigate the risk of cloud services is to ensure
that if you are storing data in the cloud that you encrypt the data before it reaches the cloud and apply an enhanced level of key management to avoid it being
compromised. And ensure that the data and the encryption keys aren’t stored together!

SMBs need to think carefully about their security strategy, how it can enable their business and if software encryption is right for them. “Good enough” security in today’s
rapidly evolving cyber security landscape will not protect your organisation – or your customers – from persistent and sophisticated attackers. Hopefully the above pointers
are a good starting point for ensuring that, when it comes to the cloud, you’ve got the right security measures in place.

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Heartbleed – Don’t Be the Next Victim

 

Heartbleed, the recently uncovered security bug in the open-source OpenSSL cryptography library, is yet another example of a serious security weakness. The Heartbleed bug allows anyone on the Internet to read the memory of the systems protected by the vulnerable versions of the OpenSSL software. When information is stored where it can be accessed publicly and the secret keys are compromised— as in this case— confidential information such as the names and passwords of website users and the actual content and information are easily revealed to hackers. Fortunately for users of IronKey™, our products have NEVER contained the vulnerable version of OpenSSL, so your data remains IronKey strong.

 

Security vulnerabilities, like Heartbleed, remind enterprises just how dangerous it is to trust storing critical information in a publicly accessible location. Passwords, encryption keys and data are all at risk in these systems. If data must be stored publicly, then it should be encrypted using a security key that is fully protected from unauthorized access. Using a hardware-based secure storage technology, such as a secure USB flash drive, to store the key and encrypt the data is the only way to be sure no outside hacker will gain access to your data. And with centralized device management, enterprises can further enhance their security measures by administering usage, password and encryption policies; even remotely destroying a compromised device erasing every block of data and initiating its self-destruct sequence, rendering it unusable.

 

IronKey makes the world’s strongest, most secure storage devices, used by the most demanding enterprises and government agencies to protect their data. Don’t become the next victim. Think IronKey.

 

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Encryption and Management are the Keys to Securing the Mobile Workforce: Secure Mobility Face-off, Part 2

 

I’m perplexed. Why don’t more companies encrypt their employees’ sensitive data? There is no technology barrier and the cost is insignificant compared to the cost of a data breach.

In a world where a data breach can cause tens or hundreds of thousands of dollars in fines that are only magnified by negative publicity, why wouldn’t every organization simply enforce encryption on data at rest – in servers, on laptops, and on USB drives – as a basic standard for doing business?

The need for encryption everywhere is further magnified by BYOD. IT leaders are waking up to the opportunity to extend BYOD strategies to PCs using technology like Windows To Go to reduce costs and improve productivity.

With Windows To Go, users can now put their entire Windows 8.1 operating system with their applications on a certified Microsoft USB drive, e.g., your whole PC on a Stick ™. The drive should be encrypted and ideally hardware encrypted to protect your private files from both brute force and physical attacks.

Strong Mobile Device Security – Encryption + Management

But encryption only gets you so far. What if a formerly trusted employee walks off with their drive, or what if their password is compromised? As an IT customer at a university recently told us:

“An unmanaged USB is like a time bomb.”

Encryption and management go hand in hand. Management improves the user experience by automating authentication for lost passwords. Systems like IronKey Enterprise Management ™ allow devices to be tracked whenever they are plugged into an Internet-connected PC, and even enable remote kill commands, so that a lost device can be completely disabled from afar.

This capability means that in a BYOD scenario, a hardware encrypted, IT managed Windows To Go PC on a Stick actually offers greater security than the typical PC deployment!

If you want to learn more, see our latest whitepaper for an in-depth look at how organizations can use Windows To Go to empower and secure their mobile workforce.

 

 

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Secure Mobility Face-off: Windows To Go vs. Laptop and VDI

BYOD is a game changer for the mobile workforce, and IT leaders are waking up to the opportunity.

One case in point: State Tech reported that Fairfax County, VA is issuing Windows To Go drives to employees who work remotely, “improving productivity and reducing the number of employee-owned PCs that IT must support.”

“There’s nothing to install or configure. Employees simply plug the drives into their Windows 7– or Windows 8–compatible PCs or other devices, connect to the county network via a virtual private network, and work anytime, anywhere.”

Microsoft’s Windows To Go – an enterprise feature of Windows 8.1 – is a simple, cost effective way to liberate the corporate desktop from any single device by placing a full version of Windows 8.1, applications, security tools and policies onto a secure USB 3.0 stick. Employees and/or contractors now can work securely on most any laptop or tablet with a USB port.

Imation™ was an early proponent of the mobile USB workspace, so it’s gratifying to for us to see the growing excitement and adoption of Windows To Go among both enterprise and government organizations. As we meet forward-thinking IT leaders at seminars, trade shows, events around the world, it’s increasingly clear that Windows To Go represents an exciting and pragmatic new way to work for teleworkers, contractors and road warriors – and even students and teachers.

IT needs to keep evaluating new ways to increase security, manageability and flexibility for a mobile workforce while managing costs. In this context, we’re hearing from customers that Windows To Go delivers advantages over laptops in five key areas, as illustrated in our infographic, below:

  • Cost – The Windows To Go drive can be the D in the BYOD strategy, costing 1/5 to 1/10 what it would cost to deploy a laptop – a benefit for BYOD strategy and easing replacement costs for lost or stolen drives.
  • Security – The Ponemon Institute reports that only 31% of lost or stolen laptops were enabled for encryption. Standardizing on a Windows To Go certified, hardware encrypted USB 3.0 drive dramatically improves security from data breaches.
  • Manageability – Windows To Go lets you centrally manage the OS just as you do with laptops. In addition, innovations such as the IronKey Enterprise Service add the ability to track Windows To Go drives and do remote wipe or remote detonation if they are lost or stolen.
  • Deployment – Windows To Go drives are easy to deploy, lightweight to carry, and less costly to ship. And with provisioning tools, even hardware encrypted drives can be deployed centrally by the dozen.
  • Resilience – IDC report that 86% of organizations have had laptops lost or stolen, and more than half of those reported a security breach. A ruggedized, hardware encrypted drive like the IronKey Workspace W500™ resists both physical damage and physical tampering, and is useless to a thief if lost or stolen.

Of course, you can’t use a Windows To Go drive without a laptop. But when the work environment is on the move and BYOD is changing the rules of the game, Windows To Go delivers for IT and employees across multiple fronts.

We plan go into each of these advantages in more detail on the IronKey blog over the next few weeks, so watch this space. Comment below to share your thoughts in the meantime.

And if you want to learn more, download our latest whitepaper, an in-depth look at how organizations can use Windows To Go to empower and secure the mobile workforce.

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Sochi Games and Windows To Go – BYOB — Bring Your Own Burner

With reporters just starting to show up at the Sochi Games, their horror stories are emerging on everything from yellow drinking water, poisoned dogs and roofless hotel rooms to a hacker heaven. Digital connectivity and security are going to be hot topics and major issues during the Games. The IronKey Workspace™ for Windows to Go, a PC on a Stick™, is a great solution for anyone traveling to Russia. Here’s why:

Russia has LAWFUL interception of ALL communications. There is ONE network, completely government controlled. What this means is, if you want to be online — unless you are working on a highly classified government network from your country of origin — you WILL be monitored and almost certainly hacked.

Even if you have a VPN, the Russian network will own your PC, your credentials, your certificates, etc. So you’re toast.

But you have to be connected and get work done. What do you do?

Take three things on your trip:

  • IronKey Workspace W500™ for Windows To Go, with your needed applications and public files. You can plug the Windows To Go drive into almost any computer, work solely from the USB stick and not leave a trace behind.
  • Laptop, with the hard drive either disabled or removed (just to be safe)
  • Burner cell phone – buy with cash.

The good news is you can be connected this way without digital harm. The bad news is that, while you’re in Russia, you’ll have to assume all of your communications are public and not secure.  But you can stay completely connected, be productive, and still be safe when you return home.

While in Russia, you can use Windows To Go in your laptop, do all your work with your regular applications and stay connected to home base. The Windows 8.1 operating system you load on Windows To Go must contain applications and files that are not sensitive, because once you log on to the network, you need to assume anyone can see them and know it’s you. Same thing with when you use your cell. Even burner cells can be traced and triangulated. Just ask the DEA.

Once you get home, have IT re-provision your Windows To Go device. Or do it yourself. Load up all your applications and files, including all the sensitive ones. Windows To Go can be used again, completely securely in other countries. You can use it with your regular laptop or the drive-less one you got for the trip. Destroy the cell just like in cop shows.

Bon voyage!

 

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3 Tips For Enabling Data Security and Mobility at Government Agencies

October marks the end of the US federal government’s fiscal year, and Imation’s mobile security experts are very busy discussing the benefit of our solutions with IT staffs at various agencies. We typically see an increase in interest near the end of the fiscal year, but there are a couple of reasons why our IronKey secure USB solutions are more top-of mind this year than in the past.

There is an increased focus from government agencies on enabling computer mobility. Like many other sectors, government agencies understand that mobile devices make employees more productive, a fact which was backed up as recently as May in an 1105 Government Information Group report. IronKey secure USB data storage devices and IronKey Workspace Windows To Go solutions enable end user mobility, as government employees can take their data and desktop environments with them wherever they go securely.

Microsoft Windows 8 spotlights how USB devices can serve as a secure, mobile computing alternative for BYOD. Microsoft cites Windows To Go, which enables a fully functioning Windows desktop to be booted from a USB device, as a key enterprise feature of Windows 8. Government agencies are taking notice.

At the same time, government IT staffs are justifiably concerned about security. The same 1105 Government Information Group report cited earlier notes that agencies are providing their employees with agency-issued devices, primarily because they are worried about the lack of control. A government mobility policy in these situations shifts away from BYOD, since employees cannot bring their own devices.

Any solution involving mobile devices (whether through employee devices or agency-provided devices) must include policies and technology to protect against data leakage or misused data.

In general, we offer these tips as part of such policies:

1) Access control: Agencies must establish and enforce strict methods for granting device access.

2) Auditing: IT departments should schedule frequent audits to make sure that devices are in the right hands and are being used appropriately.

3) Remote kill: Government agencies should deploy mobile solutions that enable remote kill capabilities, so that devices can be erased or destroyed if they fall into the wrong hands.