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The Age of Hacking

In today’s digital age, teaching children to code seems like a fantastic idea. Children are already spending huge amounts of time using technology, whether it’s a laptop, smartphone or tablet device and these IT skills can be essential in their future careers. However, whilst we must help a new generation of competent workers prepare for the digital world, how can we make sure that children will use their coding and programming skills for good and not evil?

Over the past years we’ve seen a number of technological innovations aimed at equipping children with basic programming and coding skills – from the Raspberry Pi to the recently launched Hackaball, a programmable ball aimed towards 6-10 year-old children. This demographic has been a key target for the UK government who have dominated the primary computing curriculum since September 2014.

However, with these skills being so easily transferrable to illegal activities such as hacking and cybercrime, how can we ensure that the lure of mischief, malice and money won’t sway children to ‘the dark side’? In January of this year, a seven-year-old girl hacked a public Wi-Fi network in just over ten minutes by learning how to set up a rogue access point to activate what is known as a ‘man in the middle’ attack. We know that this is already happening – hackers as young as 16 years old have been arrested for cybercrime, and the Home Office has warned that young video game hackers could be the next generation of cybercriminals.

So how can we tackle this? When it comes to children and young adults, the first place to start is at school and at home. Responsible adults, teachers and parents have a duty to ensure that their children, or pupils, are not engaging in criminal activity, and this is no different in the cyber world.

However, the problem we encounter here is the massive gulf between adults and children when it comes to understanding technology. An Ofcom survey released in August last year found that younger people have a far more advanced understanding of technology devices than adults – with 6 year olds having the same level of knowledge as the average 45 year old. In fact, teenagers aged between 14-19 years old are the most digitally confident in the UK.

If teachers and parents are to monitor and guide young people’s use of technology and make sure they’re not becoming involved in cybercrime, they must first be able to understand the technology themselves.

Secondly, we must consider the types of devices and technology that young people are using and put appropriate security measures in place to limit the possibility of malicious use. Technology like the Windows To Go USB Flash Drive would give young coders a replica desktop, just like the one they have at school, that they can take home and use on any device, without affecting or accessing the data and operating system sitting on that device. With a Windows To Go device it’s very easy to manage activity. The school can control the transfer of information and wipe, delete, monitor actions on the device, this way, the youngsters can hone their coding skills without being able to get in trouble by conducting activities outside the school’s remit.

What is clear is that we must not discourage children from learning these skills – they are absolutely essential for future employment and also play an important role in their everyday socialising with their peers. We must also accept that we cannot stop this evolution. Children are already learning these skills, with or without your knowledge and input, so the best we can do is to help shape that knowledge and put them on a good path.

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The Cost of Cybercrime

 

Hackers are holding the world to ransom with cyber-attacks costing the global economy more than £238 billion a year¹. These attacks damage the global economy almost as much as illegal drugs and piracy, with financial losses from cyber theft resulting in a potential 150,000 European job losses.¹ Cybercrime is a growing menace which is proving to be an ever growing challenge for individuals and businesses. US retailing giant Target saw its earnings drop 46% after an attack that leaked more than 40 million customer credit card details², whilst eBay and Office have also been ‘hit’ this year, with customer data compromised.

Despite these devastating implications, the public, corporates and their employees continue to be careless with their valuable and highly confidential data –residing on laptops, tablets and mobile devices. Cyber espionage and theft of individuals’ personal information is believed to have affected more than 800 million people during 2013¹, and our mobile working culture has made data security an even greater challenge.

With IDC estimating that over one million smartphones were shipped last year³, someone somewhere in your company is using a personal, mobile device to connect to a corporate network and download sensitive data – making your organization a sitting target for cybercriminals. Companies must equip their employees with the means to protect corporate data from threats such as identity theft and cyber espionage, whilst mitigating the dangers associated with unsecured devices and free Wi-Fi hotspots.

Mobile devices need to maintain the same high levels of security as office-based desktops and servers, with only IT provisioned laptops or tablets connected to corporate networks. But, the best way of ensuring hackers can’t gain access to your company data, is by storing all your data on a secure fully encrypted Windows To Go USB flash drive. It provides employees with an IT managed and provisioned Windows workspace that replicates their secure office desktop environment, on any device that the USB is plugged into. This also means IT departments do not need to deploy individual computers but rather can deploy the Windows To Go workspace on USB drives which saves time, resources and introduces vast cost savings.

Staff awareness plays a crucial role in protecting the company network against cybercrime. Often under-estimating the inherent security risks of using personal devices in the office, employees must be educated to handle these responsibly – on a proactive, ongoing basis rather than waiting until a security breach occurs, when it’s too late.

With so many high profile security breaches making the headlines, organizations want to know that corporate data is secure at all times, regardless of where it resides, whilst employees need the flexibility to work remotely. Cybercrime can have a devastating impact on your business in terms of cost and reputation. Your organization can’t afford to be tomorrow’s headline…

 

Sources:

¹McAfee report, June 2014 – Net Losses: Estimating the Global Cost of Cybercrime

² http://www.businessweek.com/articles/2014-03-13/target-missed-alarms-in-epic-hack-of-credit-card-data

³ International Data Corporation (IDC)Worldwide Quarterly Mobile Phone Tracker, Jan 2014

 

 

 


 

 

 

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The Mobile Worker – A Look Back and a Look Ahead

In 2011, there were approximately 1.3 billion mobile workers and this number is expected to grow to 1.6 billion by 2015, according to IDC.  And as the breadth of our mobile workforce expands, the opportunity for targeted data breaches is increasing exponentially as well.

The rise of the teleworker is a boon to business and government organizations. At the same time, the expanding mobile workforce is fueling the evolving threat landscape — Symantec’s 2012 Norton Cybercrime Report notes that cybercriminals targeting mobile devices and mobile vulnerabilities doubled from 2010 to 2011.  IT departments must find new ways to protect corporate data at risk of malicious penetration from the outside, and malicious or careless insiders as well.

So what does this mean for the IT department? A new generation of mobile workers needs secure, portable workspace environments, and secure mobile device control systems.

Here’s another look at our advice for IT departments managing a worker-on-the-go:

  • Staff need to be educated on the responsibilities of handling mobile devices and the data security risks
    Proper training has to be a major part of educating staff on how to use mobile technology in order to do their jobs without risking a data breach.
  • Implement secure computing solutions that allow employees secure access to what they need
    Teleworkers need to be able to conduct their daily business from any location and must therefore be equipped with hardware encrypted solutions with strong user authentication.
  • Provide a secure platform that locks down the host-computer
    As organizations continue to accept that mobile workspaces are extremely convenient and flexible, advanced centralized deployment and management are key elements of maintaining and controlling a secure environment.
  • Make it easy and convenient enough to avoid workarounds
    Mobile devices must act like the desktop an employee has left at their office otherwise users will inevitably break security protocols.

Employees and IT organizations should learn from the security-related mistakes of the past. Technological advancements to the ways in which we work will continue to evolve and while it is not something that we want to stop but we must leverage the lessons learned and be smarter about mobile safety.