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The Cost of Cybercrime

 

Hackers are holding the world to ransom with cyber-attacks costing the global economy more than £238 billion a year¹. These attacks damage the global economy almost as much as illegal drugs and piracy, with financial losses from cyber theft resulting in a potential 150,000 European job losses.¹ Cybercrime is a growing menace which is proving to be an ever growing challenge for individuals and businesses. US retailing giant Target saw its earnings drop 46% after an attack that leaked more than 40 million customer credit card details², whilst eBay and Office have also been ‘hit’ this year, with customer data compromised.

Despite these devastating implications, the public, corporates and their employees continue to be careless with their valuable and highly confidential data –residing on laptops, tablets and mobile devices. Cyber espionage and theft of individuals’ personal information is believed to have affected more than 800 million people during 2013¹, and our mobile working culture has made data security an even greater challenge.

With IDC estimating that over one million smartphones were shipped last year³, someone somewhere in your company is using a personal, mobile device to connect to a corporate network and download sensitive data – making your organization a sitting target for cybercriminals. Companies must equip their employees with the means to protect corporate data from threats such as identity theft and cyber espionage, whilst mitigating the dangers associated with unsecured devices and free Wi-Fi hotspots.

Mobile devices need to maintain the same high levels of security as office-based desktops and servers, with only IT provisioned laptops or tablets connected to corporate networks. But, the best way of ensuring hackers can’t gain access to your company data, is by storing all your data on a secure fully encrypted Windows To Go USB flash drive. It provides employees with an IT managed and provisioned Windows workspace that replicates their secure office desktop environment, on any device that the USB is plugged into. This also means IT departments do not need to deploy individual computers but rather can deploy the Windows To Go workspace on USB drives which saves time, resources and introduces vast cost savings.

Staff awareness plays a crucial role in protecting the company network against cybercrime. Often under-estimating the inherent security risks of using personal devices in the office, employees must be educated to handle these responsibly – on a proactive, ongoing basis rather than waiting until a security breach occurs, when it’s too late.

With so many high profile security breaches making the headlines, organizations want to know that corporate data is secure at all times, regardless of where it resides, whilst employees need the flexibility to work remotely. Cybercrime can have a devastating impact on your business in terms of cost and reputation. Your organization can’t afford to be tomorrow’s headline…

 

Sources:

¹McAfee report, June 2014 – Net Losses: Estimating the Global Cost of Cybercrime

² http://www.businessweek.com/articles/2014-03-13/target-missed-alarms-in-epic-hack-of-credit-card-data

³ International Data Corporation (IDC)Worldwide Quarterly Mobile Phone Tracker, Jan 2014

 

 

 


 

 

 

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Sochi Games and Windows To Go – BYOB — Bring Your Own Burner

With reporters just starting to show up at the Sochi Games, their horror stories are emerging on everything from yellow drinking water, poisoned dogs and roofless hotel rooms to a hacker heaven. Digital connectivity and security are going to be hot topics and major issues during the Games. The IronKey Workspace™ for Windows to Go, a PC on a Stick™, is a great solution for anyone traveling to Russia. Here’s why:

Russia has LAWFUL interception of ALL communications. There is ONE network, completely government controlled. What this means is, if you want to be online — unless you are working on a highly classified government network from your country of origin — you WILL be monitored and almost certainly hacked.

Even if you have a VPN, the Russian network will own your PC, your credentials, your certificates, etc. So you’re toast.

But you have to be connected and get work done. What do you do?

Take three things on your trip:

  • IronKey Workspace W500™ for Windows To Go, with your needed applications and public files. You can plug the Windows To Go drive into almost any computer, work solely from the USB stick and not leave a trace behind.
  • Laptop, with the hard drive either disabled or removed (just to be safe)
  • Burner cell phone – buy with cash.

The good news is you can be connected this way without digital harm. The bad news is that, while you’re in Russia, you’ll have to assume all of your communications are public and not secure.  But you can stay completely connected, be productive, and still be safe when you return home.

While in Russia, you can use Windows To Go in your laptop, do all your work with your regular applications and stay connected to home base. The Windows 8.1 operating system you load on Windows To Go must contain applications and files that are not sensitive, because once you log on to the network, you need to assume anyone can see them and know it’s you. Same thing with when you use your cell. Even burner cells can be traced and triangulated. Just ask the DEA.

Once you get home, have IT re-provision your Windows To Go device. Or do it yourself. Load up all your applications and files, including all the sensitive ones. Windows To Go can be used again, completely securely in other countries. You can use it with your regular laptop or the drive-less one you got for the trip. Destroy the cell just like in cop shows.

Bon voyage!

 

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Bring out the heavy hardware to protect passwords

Use strong passwords, un-guessable security codes and hardware encryption to defeat advanced threats

As long as you have a password in place, your data is protected, right? The number and types of breaches we saw in 2012 challenge this notion. From LinkedIn to eHarmony to Twitter, cyber thieves have been on the hunt to break the barriers of thousands of simple passwords. And what is most chilling? it’s not going to stop.

Passwords have been around since the dawn of the digital age, but they are not well understood. Simple, overused passwords can’t protect data from even low-skilled hackers. And people are people, and even when they are outfitted with The World’s Most Secure Flash Drive, need a reminder that making your password “password” is no longer (if ever) considered clever or safe.

With rising attention to data privacy and increasing risk of data breaches, there will be more encryption across all devices and platforms in 2013. Which means that it is never too soon to revisit the password. Here are four best practices organizations should follow to improve password strength their organization:

  1. Passwords must be longer, stronger and un-guessable
    Passwords protected in software are subject to offline brute force attacks, which is why web service hacks can be so devastating. Attackers can go through a database of passwords they have obtained and crack them at their leisure.  It is remarkable the number of individuals who use the password “password” or “123456”. These passwords are often the first ones breached by cyber-thieves, as can be noted in last years LinkedIn and Twitter breaches.

    • Instead, choose a unique password, with character complexity and a combination of both letters and numbers. A strong password should be at least 12 characters long. The rule is that the longer the password, the longer it will protect you. A good hacker can breach an 8-character password in a few days; a 15 character password might take a year.
    • To make the password even stronger, the character complexity should be at random, as complexity alone is not enough to stop a hacker in today’s digital age. Having a strong password makes offline attacks much more difficult for hackers.
  2. Remember Personal Information is Out There
    With today’s heavy social media presence, the names of your dog or your mother’s maiden name are no longer confidential information. The public has access to the information you post on your social media site, and unwittingly offer clues to clever hackers. When choosing security questions for password recovery, be mindful of the information that is public, and create passwords that revolve around something actually “private.”
  3. Use Hardware Encryption to Combat Advanced Software Threads
    Avoiding the threat of brute force attacks on passwords requires heavier hardware – hardware encryption, that is. A password protected in the right kind of hardware makes security simpler, because this kind of brute force attack to decrypt the password is not possible. The hardware will lock up after a low number of attempts (set by policy), and then the attack stops.

And finally, a bonus point: Remember to set strong policies and educate employees. Cyber-thieves are becoming more sophisticated, and strong passwords are the best defense. Organizations must create stricter guidelines for employee password security in order to keep their employee’s personal and the company’s corporate data secure.